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Pu'er Tea

Date:2015-07-14

 
Pu-erh or Pu’er is a variety of aged dark tea produced in Yunnan province, China. Fermentation is a tea production style in which the tea leaves undergo microbial fermentation and oxidation after they are dried and rolled. This process is a Chinese specialty and produces tea known as Hei Cha (黑茶hēichá), commonly translated as dark, or black tea (this type of tea is different from what in the West is known as "black tea", which in China is called "red tea" (红茶hóngchá). The best known variety of this category of tea is Pu-erh from Yunnan Province, named after the trading post for dark tea during imperial China.
Pu’er traditionally begins as a raw product known as "rough" Mao Cha (毛茶máochá) and can be sold in this form or pressed into a number of shapes and sold as "raw" Sheng Cha (生茶shēngchá). Both of these forms then undergo the complex process of gradual fermentation and maturation with time. The Wo Dui process (渥堆wòduī) developed in the mid-1970s by the Menghai and Kunming Tea Factories created a new type of pu-erh tea, whose legitimacy is disputed by some traditionalists. This process involves an accelerated fermentation into "ripe" Shu Cha (熟茶shúchá) which is then stored loose or pressed into various shapes.
Scientific studies report that consumption of pu’er tea leaves significantly suppressed the expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS) in the livers of rats; gains in body weight, levels of triacylglycerol, and total cholesterol were also suppressed. Pu’er tea is widely sold, by itself or in blends, with unsubstantiated claims that it promotes loss of body weight in humans.


Image
Common name
Description
Bǐngchá
Bing,Beeng, Cake, or Disc
A round, flat, disc or puck-shaped tea, the size ranges from as small as 100g to as large as 5 kg or more, with 357g being the most common. It is also commonly known as Qīzí bǐngchá, (literally "seven units cake tea”) because seven of the bing are packaged together at a time for sale or transport.
Tuóchá
Tuocha, Bowl, or Nest
A convex knob-shaped tea, its size ranges from 3g to 3 kg or more, with 100g, 250g being the most common.
Zhuānchá
Brick
A thick rectangular block of tea, usually in 100g, 250g, 500g and 1000g sizes; Zhuancha bricks are the traditional shape used for ease of transport along the ancient tea route by horse caravans.
Jǐnchá
Mushroom
Literally meaning "tight tea," the tea is shaped much like a 250g to 300g túocha, but with a stem rather than a convex hollow. This makes them quite similar in form to a mushroom. Pu’er tea of this shape is generally produced for Tibetan consumption.
Jīnguā gòngchá
Melon, or gold melon
Its shape is similar to tuóchá, size ranges from 100g to more than 100kg, with a much thicker body decorated with pumpkin-like stripes. This shape was created for the "Tribute tea" made expressly for the Qing dynasty emperors from the best tea leaves.

信息来源:
原文链接:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pu-erh_tea#cite_note-rats-36
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